Koemba Blog

Parenting Workshops with  Parenting Author Val Mullally in Moville, Co Donegal

Fri 10 March 7:30 – 9 pm

‘From Conflict to Calm – How to Deal with a Child’s Angry Outbursts’

Sat 11 March 

‘From Survive to Thrive’ 

Moville Methodist Hall 

most suitable for parents of children aged 3 to 12 years

(Grandparents, child-carers and educators all welcome)

Friday night: 10 Mar 7:30pm for 7:45pm

‘From Conflict to Calm’ 

Do you get frustrated with yourself for ‘losing the cool’?

Do you get frustrated with your kids fighting?

Does family conflict cloud the happiness in your home?

Discover:

✓   How to calm your own reactivity

✓   How to help children use their squabbles constructively

✓   Why anger matters and what to do to create a calmer home

 

Saturday morning: 11 Mar 11:45 am – 1:15pm

‘From SURVIVE to THRIVE’

Are you concerned about your child’s lack of confidence?

Are you worried about your child ‘not fitting in’?

Is your child being teased?

Does your child say s/he has no friends?

Do you sense your child could do better or be happier?

 Discover:

✓ HOW to help your child feel more confident

✓  the power of a sense of belonging

✓  the 3 essential aspects of self esteem

✓  the self-esteem secret that every parent needs to know

The three signposts to create a calmer, happier home

Tea / coffee provided.

Val’s book ‘BEHAVE – What To Do When Your Child Won’t’ available for purchase.

 

To book your place contact Rev. Alison Gallagher:

email allygallagher60@gmail.com or phone: 087 263 2906

Donation €5 per session. 

Val Mullally has been working with Parents for over fifteen years, after a rewarding career as a teacher, school principal and trainer in Early Education. She runs Koemba Parenting courses and workshops.                                                   

Consistent in your actions

 Every parent wants to be a ‘good parent’ – but what’s needed?

‘Any area in your life that has inconsistent results is an area where you have not made a decision to be consistent in your actions.’ Jeanine Blackwell

I love this quote. It challenges me in my work as a soulpreneur and coach. But is it true when it comes to effective Parenting? What does it take to be the parent you want to be? If consistency leads to awesome results in the workplace is the same true for parenting? If I am consistent in my actions as a parent will I get consistent results? I’d love to believe it, but when it comes to parenting, whether you are parenting a toddler or parenting a teenager – think again!

As humans, consistency isn’t always a natural way of being. Circumstances change. Family dynamics change. People change. Especially little people. And when change happens there isn’t going to be a consistency in result. There will always be challenges and inconsistencies in raising children. Every child is different, so every parenting experience is different. And as our children move through different developmental stages the experience and the challenges are different. As one mum said, ‘Every time I think I have this parenting thing sorted, my child pulls the rug out from under my feet.’

So  – how to be a ‘Good Parent’?

We can judge ourselves that we’re not being ‘good’ parents when things don’t go smoothly, but we need to hold in mind that we’re in the job for the long haul. There will be ups and downs, particularly as we move through times of change. Consistency in our parenting can be really hard.

So does this mean, as parents, we should forget about consistency? No! Consistency matters if we want to be the parents our children need.

Consistency matters – particularly in the things that are so hard to measure:

Patience.  Kindness. Awareness. Believing in your child.

Patience, kindness, awareness, believing in your child

 

Consistency matters particularly in the moments when no-one else is looking:

–  those moments when you might be tempted to yell or scream at the kids

– those moments when you might be tempted to use sarcasm

– those moments when you might be tempted to say ‘Whatever!’ rather than do the hard work of conscious parenting

Does that mean you’ll see consistent parenting results? In the short term, probably not! You’ll still ride the roller coaster of everyday parenting, with all its wild ups and downs and unexpected corners. But in the long term, consistency pays off every time. Look around you and notice the families whose children have grown into fabulous young adults. Warm, caring, compassionate, responsible young people invariably have warm, caring, compassionate, responsible parents.

Consistency pays.

We may have different parenting styles, but consistency always matters. consistency matters as much in the world of parenting as in the world of the entrepeneur.

What three qualities or values do you choose to consistently model to your children? It doesn’t come by chance. It comes from a conscious decision.

So now it’s your turn to challenge your online community. What three values did you choose?  Please share your thoughts in the comments box below.

Consistent in your actions

  

Needing support to be the parent you want to be?  Discover more about Parent Coaching.

 

 

Season’s Greetings

Whoever you are – where you are – wishing you a wonder-full 2017. Thank you for your support during the year past.

Watch out for Val Mullally’s new Parenting book due for release Spring 2017!Wishing you a wonder-full 2017

Setting Limits with a Strong Willed Child

Jane breaks off our conversation mid-sentence. She dashes across the room to her toddler who is wrenching a doll from a child half her own size. It’s hard to set limits with a strong willed child!

‘Mary, Suzie is playing with the doll now. Wait your turn.’

Jane remains calm yet firm as she holds a limit with her child. Mary cries her protest. Jane consoles her and, as her tears subside, she redirects her attention to another toy.  Every parent of a young child identifies with the challenge of holding helpful boundaries, especially with a strong willed child, so that little ones learn how to handle social interactions. What we sometimes overlook is how we, as parents, cross boundaries with our children in a way that is hurtful, and possibly even harmful to their emotional well-being and our relationship with them. Think about this situation:

The hostess bends towards Linda’s five year old. The lady holds a plate with a tantalising array of cookies. Little chocolate balls, squares of shortbread, star-shaped biscuits glittering with tens and thousands, tiny coconut rolls with cherries on top. The child reaches out his hand but before he can choose a cookie, his mother reaches forward, takes a plain shortbread and passes it to him. The child pulls back in protest. He wants to choose his own. ‘Take it,’ hisses his mother.

The child plonks himself on the chair, head down, bottom lip thrusting forward, arms folded.

‘Behave yourself,’ admonishes his mother.

Her son is not ‘misbehaving’. He’s protesting at the way she has infringed his boundary. Linda seems unaware that her behaviour as a parent hasn’t been helpful here. Imagine how you would feel if you were offered a delicious choice of cookies, then someone picked up the plainest biscuit on the plate and insisted that’s the one you were to eat. How would you react!

As parents, we often think that we ‘know best’. When they protest we label them as ‘strong willed’ or ‘defiant’. We try to tell our children what they ‘should’ do or think. We attempt to assert power over the child’s internal processing.

Our parenting would be more helpful if we  rather than gently guide and support our children to find their own unique path. When we see a situation from the child’s perspective, we recognise that sometimes their ‘bad behaviour’ is a protest because we infringe their boundaries; we try to take control of that which is not ours to rightfully control.

We infringe our children’s boundaries when we impose our will on what can be a child’s decision. Every child is a unique person who intuitively senses his need to find his own path in life. He learns by what is modeled to him, but he’s likely to resist that which is imposed.

‘The more you insist the more I resist.’

The more you insist the more I resist!

Sometimes our behaviour to our children is hurtful rather than helpful. When we exert control over our children, rather than supporting them to develop co-operative behaviour, we are breaching the boundaries of our relationship. We as parents need to learn the art of self-containment – of not taking control of that which is not ours to decide. In any relationship, whether parent-child, adult to adult, or even country to country, issues of damaged boundaries are invariably linked to power being wielded inappropriately.

A helpful analogy in this regard is one’s own skin – a flexible membrane that both protects one from infection and damage and contains that which is within. Without the boundary of our skin there would not be adequate containment for us or for others. It is interesting to note that when we cross the boundaries of appropriate social conduct, our metaphors of speech relate closely to that of breaking the boundary of skin; we refer to a person “being abrasive”, of “feeling wounded” or “scarred”.

As parents we need to be aware that our everyday interactions can cause ‘relationship eczema’ – ‘an itch that rashes’. Small infringements of our children’s boundaries can overtime spread into a painful, inflammatory condition. I know this through my own parenting journey. It was when my second son was already a teen that I realised that it would be more helpful, rather than trying to control my child, to notice and adjust my own way of interacting.

Let’s re-run the situation with Linda. The lady offers her child the cookies. Maybe his fingers stretch out to grab a handful. Linda can gently say,

‘Choose one. When that’s finished you may have another.’

Her child might surprise her with his cooperative behaviour.

It is possible that her child might live up to her expectations of, ‘He’ll just grab’, because if he’s experienced many situations where his boundaries have been infringed, he might not now contain himself.

The answer isn’t to impose control over your child, but rather for you as parent to learn the art of Mindful Parenting; to respect the boundaries of the child (and of oneself) within the dance of relationship. But how? A starting point is to work with a Parent Coach or sign up for a Parenting Course.

It’s never too late to begin the work of respecting boundaries in our interactions. It matters not only for our parenting but for the well-being of every relationship. Our children can be our best teachers because they are so much more forthright in their behaviour than we tend to be in our adult-to adult interactions. Our children let us know through their behaviour when we haven’t contained ourselves adequately.

Imagine the ‘skin’ of your relationship. Is it smooth, flexible and healthy? Or is it angry, inflamed, easily-punctured and infected? The good news is that we as parents can be the healing balm that’s needed.

 

What do you think? We’d love to hear your stories and questions about dealing with a strong -willed child. Please share in the Comments box below because other parents are also struggling with the same challenges.

How to Set Boundaries with a Strong Willed Child

 

Join Parenting Expert Val Mullally in Moville this weekend.

Fri 4 Nov 7:30 – 9 pm  ‘Meeting Your Child’s Deepest Emotional Needs’

Sat 5 Nov ‘Responding to Children’s Challenging Behaviour’ 

Moville Methodist Hall 

Open to all parents of children aged 3 to 12 years

(grandparents and other child-carers also welcome)

 

 

 

 

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