The Whole-Brain Child: 12 Revolutionary Strategies to Nurture Your Child’s Developing Mind
From the Koemba Book Club:

The Whole-Brain Child: 12 Revolutionary Strategies to Nurture Your Child’s Developing Mind

Your toddler throws a tantrum in the middle of a store. Your preschooler refuses to get dressed. Your fifth-grader sulks on the bench instead of playing on the field. Do children conspire to make their parents’ lives endlessly challenging? No—it’s just their developing brain calling the shots!

In this pioneering, practical book, Daniel J. Siegel, neuropsychiatrist and author of the bestselling Mindsight, and parenting expert Tina Payne Bryson demystify the meltdowns and aggravation, explaining the new science of how a child’s brain is wired and how it matures. The “upstairs brain,” which makes decisions and balances emotions, is under construction until the mid-twenties. And especially in young children, the right brain and its emotions tend to rule over the logic of the left brain. No wonder kids can seem—and feel—so out of control. By applying these discoveries to everyday parenting, you can turn any outburst, argument, or fear into a chance to integrate your child’s brain and foster vital growth. Raise calmer, happier children using twelve key strategies, including

• Name It to Tame It: Corral raging right-brain behavior through left-brain storytelling, appealing to the left brain’s affinity for words and reasoning to calm emotional storms and bodily tension.
• Engage, Don’t Enrage: Keep your child thinking and listening, instead of purely reacting.
• Move It or Lose It: Use physical activities to shift your child’s emotional state.
• Let the Clouds of Emotion Roll By: Guide your children when they are stuck on a negative emotion, and help them understand that feelings come and go.
• SIFT: Help children pay attention to the Sensations, Images, Feelings, and Thoughts within them so that they can make better decisions and be more flexible.
• Connect Through Conflict: Use discord to encourage empathy and greater social success.

Complete with clear explanations, age-appropriate strategies for dealing with day-to-day struggles, and illustrations that will help you explain these concepts to your child, The Whole-Brain Child shows you how to cultivate healthy emotional and intellectual development so that your children can lead balanced, meaningful, and connected lives.

Comments
  • On Val Mullally wrote:

    p 165 – 168 (END OF THE BOOK!)
    RE 9 – 12 YR OLDS. WHAT STRIKES YOU PARTICULARLY? FOR THOSE OF YOU WHO HAVE (OR ARE IN CONTACT WITH) OLDER CHILDREN – ANY PARTICULAR AWARENESSES / ASPECTS YOU HAVE TRIED? FAVOURITE QUOTE?

  • On Val Mullally wrote:

    AND FINALLY – PLEASE WRITE JUST A COUPLE OF LINES TO DESCRIBE YOUR OPINION OF THIS BOOK. (THANK YOU TO YOU ALL FOR THE RICH
    DISCUSSION WE’VE ENJOYED)

  • On Marie Reilly wrote:

    Summary
    This is the first book solely dedicated to parenting that I have read. I have thoroughly enjoyed it. I have found it extremely beneficial on a number of fronts.
    Firstly, as a parent, the book has equipped me with numerous useful strategies for dealing with survive moments and helping my children develop into well rounded, confident people who understand both their own feelings and those of others.
    Secondly, the sections for kids are ingenious in my opinion. I have shared them with my four and five year olds and they “get” them. Much of the vocabulary from the book is now integrated into our every day family conversations. The kids are learning to see signs before they flip their lids. Even if they have gone past the point of no return and do flip their lids, once things have calmed down and they are rational again, they want to discuss the incident and learn from it. They are also happy to tell my husband and me when we have flipped our lids and when we are not in the centre of our rivers of wellbeing!
    Thirdly, we are all now using mindsight to help us understand how others are feeling.
    Discussions about our actions, our feelings and the feelings of others bring us closer together and help us to grow as individuals and as a family. Its a thoroughly useful book for parents and families.

  • On Hansi wrote:

    My Summary –

    I have to say that this is quite a gem when it comes to parenting books – I’ve never read anything like it before and I found it filled with so many techniques and principles that made so much sense and could be made applicable in any family. The fact that they had sections illustrated for the purpose of including children in the discussion is really fantastic – again, something I’ve never seen before and it just makes so much sense. I was very impressed with this book choice and know it’ll be a tool I’ll refer to throughout the years and will always point others towards. I’ll look forward to reading other work by the author as well. I wasn’t able to apply some of the strategies in my own life at this stage but definitely valued hearing everyone else’s experiences with it. It was really a valuable read and am so glad it was chosen, as I feel it provided a perfect foundation & supplement for the material we have been covering, as well as opening up excellent discussions.

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